Jun 032014
 

Why on earth would anyone want to increase the size of the Windows NTFS Master File Table?

Well in my experience the MFT can become incredibly fragmented over time and whilst the built in Windows dragger can de-fragment the MFT, it will invariably get into difficulties especially if the volume is reaching capacity.

So to help mitigate the future fragmentation of the MFT the simple answer is to cause the MFT to bloat on a newly formatted volume, if you bloat the MFT large enough it should remain in a single lump on the hard drive meaning that overall there will be less fragmentation for over larger files.

Because in my work, I need to have a large MFT, I’ve created this .Net application that will create a bunch of nested folders on a drive, then delete them again once finished.  Creating folders seems to be the easiest method of deliberately causing the MFT to grow, since each folder creates a 1024kb MFT entry (1GB of MFT = 1,024,000 folders or files).  You can check the size of your MFT by using the Sysinternals Tool – NTFSINFO.exe available from http://live.sysinternals.com/NTFSINFO.EXE.

MFTBloater

The application has been pre-configured with a number of settings, although you are welcome to change the number of folders before you click the Go button.  Depending on the speed of your disk, the application may take some time to do its stuff, plus it will max out a single core of your CPU.  Once the application has bloated your MFT, I would recommend that you defrag the volume to ensure that the MFT is placed in a contiguous block.  Ultradefrag available on SourceForge has an “Optimise MFT” action that will consolidate the MFT, moving other files out of the way.

 

MFTBloater

 

 Posted by at 10:21 am
Mar 222008
 

If you want to make use of Disk Quotas and Remote Installation Deployment tools, you will need to have separate partitions/drives to store the areas on.  It is generally good practice to have at least 2 or more partitions on your Windows Server 2003 machine.

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Mar 212008
 

Getting a company to setup and install your network will always be easier than planning and deploying your own network solution, but if you have the time and are willing to learn then you can save your school some money.  This guide will attempt to help you to setup a Windows Server 2003 Domain for your school network.

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Mar 072008
 

The Microsoft Windows Image format (WIM) is a file based format used in Windows Vista and can also be used to deploy legacy Windows XP workstations.  Because the format is file based, there are several advantages associated with this.  The image can be applied to a FAT or NTFS partition.  The format also offers Single Instance, meaning that a file is only stored once in the entire WIM image. 

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Mar 022008
 

There are many new features in Exchange 2007 that Schools may benefit from.  There are plenty or articles and bits of information about Exchange 2007 already on the Internet.  But there is not really a basic Migration guide, so I have tried to fill in the gaps so that at least School Network Administrators can have some heads up before leaping to Exchange 2007. 

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Feb 142008
 

Since ICT has become a major part of the school curriculum, the use of computers and IT resources has grown exponentially.  Almost gone are the days of running a few standalone PCs, or running a Peer to Peer Internet enabled network.  It is time to embrace the centralised server environment.  It isn't as complex as it seems.  This guide will help you to plan for your new network and give you some things to look out for when discussing a network with a third party company.

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